Style

10 February 2020

Myrto: in praise of the tourmaline

Myrto Anastasopoulou is an autodidact who adores the tourmaline: a stone with an infinite variety of shades.

By Sandrine Merle.

 

 

No St Martin’s School in London or a period with a famous jeweler for Myrto Anastasopoulou: she discovered jewelry ten years ago during a wax modeling course. “After that, I learned on the job, picking up techniques from craftspeople,” says the young designer. Her work on color, chiefly with tourmalines, is the main feature of her style.

 

A focus on tourmalines

“I like the tourmaline best because it’s the only stone with such a wealth of colors,” says Myrto. It’s impossible to list them all: there are hundreds, including black, electric blue and green. She herself prefers pastels, ranging from soft pink, lilac, khaki, raspberry and sky blue to pea green. She uses shaded tones and monochromes on bangles, rings and above all magnificent, ultra-long earrings, adding diamond or emerald chips here and there. Every pair evokes the soft lushness of an Impressionist painting.

 

Good enough to eat…

Every tourmaline, polished into a cabochon or shaped by brilliant or emerald cuts, resembles a piece of candy. And in this respect, Anastasopoulou’s jewelry in no way draws on Greek tradition. In Antiquity, precious stones like diamonds, sapphires and rubies were extremely rare, as the country had no source of supplies. They only began to appear with Alexander the Great’s conquests in the East.

 

Perfectly in tune with our times, these pastel tutti-frutti are stackable, designed to be endlessly accumulated, mingled and piled on top of each other. Each woman can find her own personal combination. Pure joy.

 

SHOP NOW “Serafina” earrings, Myrto

 

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